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caviar

caviar history

Origins of Caviar

Caviar has enjoyed lasting fame as the luxury treat in the most upscale social circles. So what's the story behind the mystery and mystique of this luxurious indulgence?

Caviar is basically the roe (eggs, also sometimes referred to as "berries" or "pearls") of the female sturgeon, a large - it can grow to over 3000 lbs, but averages 60lbs- migratory fish that has roamed the cold waters of the northern hemisphere for over 250 million years. Sturgeon is found mainly in the Caspian Sea, which laps the shore of the two major caviar-producing countries in the world, Russia and Iran, but is also found in the Black Sea, some parts of the Pacific Northwest and South Atlantic regions of North America, and is common in the big lakes and rivers in Europe. Although it is a saltwater fish, it spawns (lays eggs) in freshwater.

The British kings of the middle ages reserved all the sturgeon for their own consumption and knighted it the "Royal Fish", set aside solely for royalty. However, it was the Persians who first prepared and savored sturgeon roe- the word "caviar" actually comes from the Persian word "khav-yar" which means "cake of strength" or "cake of power", because the people of Persia attributed many medicinal powers to caviar. The Persians collected the fish eggs on the Kura River, but the tradition of salting fish roe for consumption actually originated in China, where carp eggs were prepared in this manner.

The first known record of caviar dates back to the Greek scholar Aristotle. In the 4th Century B.C. Aristotle described this delicacy as the eggs of the sturgeon, heralded into banquets amongst trumpets and flowers. But it was Russia and the Russian Tsars that catapulted caviar into the world of utter luxury. The golden roe of the Sterlet sturgeon - now over fished to the point of near extinction- produced what would become the "imperial" caviar, the most delicate and coveted type of caviar available.

As time progressed, gourmet caviar spread to all countries across Europe, and was prized by nearly every culture. One jar of caviar equaled one hundred sheep in the second century B.C., making it exclusive to higher-class citizens.

Caviar in America

Believe it or not, caviar once used to joyfully flow in American saloons and dining establishments, sold at a mere nickel. Like the ever-present pretzel, caviar's saltiness produced thirst, which caused patrons to spend more money in beer. The American caviar industry took root with Henry Schacht, a German immigrant to America who first developed a caviar business in 1873 based on the catch of sturgeon in the Delaware River at Penns Grove, New Jersey, where sturgeon was plentiful. Schacht created the first company to distribute caviar throughout the world, exporting American sturgeon caviar to Europe at a -gulp- dollar a pound. By the 19th century, the United States produced 90% of the world's caviar, which was then re-imported to the United States as "Russian Caviar".go figure, right? The state of Pennsylvania in 1900 estimated that about 90 percent of Russian caviar that was sold in Europe actually originated in the US.

Today, several factors have caused the US caviar industry to take a huge leap forward. The depletion of the Caspian Sea sturgeon populations, political turmoil in the major caviar producing countries- Russia and Iran- and a wider acceptance of other types of fish roe- such as lumpfish, hackleback, trout and salmon, amongst others- as "caviar", has created a bigger demand for American caviar, considered by connoisseurs to be a solid, affordable alternative to Russian and Iranian caviars. The U.S.'s dominance over caviar production has decreased significantly due to the near extinction of the sturgeon in American waters.

Preparing Caviar

The tradition of preparing caviar has remained the same for thousands of years, and is one of the many reasons why caviar prices are so exorbitant. The harvesting, preparation and manufacture, of caviar is incredibly arduous, and follows strict traditional methods.

The birth of caviar - almost literally- begins with the removal of the fish eggs (roe) from the sturgeon. One of the many reasons sturgeon populations have been in such sharp decline is because the most predominant method of extracting the eggs from the sturgeon involves the actual killing of the fish (either before or after the removal of the egg sack). The roe is sieved and "filtered" into different sizes, and then carefully cleaned and rinsed. Classification takes place according to size and color (the 000 to 0 designations), and the caviar moves on to the salting step.

The purpose of salting is primarily to preserve the caviar, and maintain as much of the 'fresh' flavor as possible. Therefore, the amount of salt used can vary. "Malossol" caviar- the most superior type- is prepared with little salt. Other types of caviar can be more or less salted. Although things have changed over the year, one thing still remains true: the salt. A special kind of salt was - an is- used to prepare caviar, a very chlorine-free salt from the Russian Astrakhan Steppe, stored for seven years to assure the least chlorine content. Even Iranian caviar factories now export this salt from Russia, so that Russian and Iranian caviars are almost indistinct in flavor and texture. Traditionally, Borax (an additive) was also added to caviar, for an extra sweetness. Borax is considered an illegal food additive in the United States, so you won't find it domestically (although if you're taking a trip to Europe.).

With over 60 different caviar varieties, Gourmet Food Store offers one of the best places to buy caviar online, backed up by a quality guarantee. Take a look at the some of the most sought after gourmet caviars that Gourmet Food Store has to offer:

Or take a look by some favorite caviar types:

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